Archive | April, 2013

What Will Happen To The Zombies When All The Humans Are Gone?

29 Apr

Imagine the zombie apocalypse has come and the last living person (or uninfected human depending on your preferred zombie scenario) has just been consumed; humanity has gone, or at least that’s how it seems. This is where most tales of the undead would end. However, I’d like you to take a moment to think about what would happen next. That is, what would happen on planet Earth after all those we’d recognise as humans are gone and all that’s left is the zombie horde? There’s two possibilities, one is obvious while the second, more interesting one, is not.

The obvious possibility is that the zombies will simply disappear once the last of their preferred human prey have been consumed. This may happen quickly if the zombies are living people infected by some sort of disease that makes them act like zombies as they starve to death, or slowly if they are the more traditional, risen-from-the-dead zombies that will gradually rot away and turn to dust. Once this happens, the Earth will undoubtedly pick itself up, shake itself off and set to work recovering both from the effects of the zombies and, indeed, the brief blip (geologically-speaking) that was human civilisation.

The world might one day see intelligent life again, but this will have to wait until a new species evolves to fill the void left by the end of humanity and because of the way evolution works, it’s far from certain that this will ever happen. If it does, these new intelligence beings may one day find traces of humanity and wonder who or what created them just as Europeans did when they first discovered the ruins of ancient Mesoamerican cultures deep within what they assumed were pristine rain forests. Where would these new intelligent beings come from? Well, that’s hard to predict. It could once again come from our own great ape lineage, maybe the bonobos or the orangutans, but it could also come from our more distant cousins the baboons, monkeys or even lemurs. However, it could just as easily come from a completely different lineage, such as the cats (remember Red Dwarf?), the weasels, the dolphins or maybe even one of the more intelligent bird groups such as the parrots or the crows. It could even come from some much more unexpected group, for that is the unpredictability of evolution.

The less obvious but more interesting possibility could only occur if we’re talking about a zombie apocalypse caused by a virus or some sort of contagious disease that infects the living rather than raising the dead. If the disease doesn’t completely take over the brain, as was the case of the rage virus in 28 Days Later, some primitive urges or lower brain functions could survive intact. I’m not talking about any intelligent consciousness here but rather the sub-conscious and the innate – those things our bodies do without us having to tell them to do it. While these infected will act like zombies, they could still be stirred by primal urges such as hunger. Once they have munched their way through humanity, these infected will likely turn their attention to other animals in order to feed themselves but these will be both much less numerous and more difficult to catch. Again there will be a mass die-offs, taking with it 95 to 99% of the infected humans but crucially some small fraction will find enough sustenance to survive meaning they won’t die out completely.

Instead, the number of infected will eventually level out as they reach a balance with whichever ecosystem they find themselves in (known to ecologists as the carrying capacity). This will allow some infected persist for years, probably decades, becoming just another predator and/or scavenger which other animals have to deal with. If this happens, another rather interesting question raises its head: will these infected reproduce? If they still retain the primitive urges associated with hunger, it is feasible that they might also retain what might be euphemistically referred to as ‘reproductive’ urges.

So what will happen if an infected becomes pregnant? Well, this will depend on how the disease can be transmitted. If the disease can only be passed from person to person through contact (known as horizontal transmission), whenever an infected gives birth, it’s likely to attack and kill the baby (since the mother will recognise it as an uninfected human and respond accordingly). If this is the case, the infected will eventually die out and the world will carry on without us. If, however, there is vertical transmission, something much more interesting could occur. Vertical transmission means the passing of the disease directly from mother to unborn child. This occurs in many human diseases (think of things like HIV) and would mean that any babies would be born infected and would not automatically be attacked by their mothers. If there’s any of the basic human nurturing instinct left unharmed by the disease, infected mothers might care enough for their children for them to survive into adulthood and a breeding population of infected will come into existence, creating a new lineage of infected humans.

Yet, it might not end there. Given enough time, these new Homo sapiens may eventually evolve some level of immunity to whatever disease it is that’s infecting them and they could eventually regain some of the human qualities not seen since the disease took over the bodies of their distant ancestors. They might even reach the point where they could start to rebuild civilisation. However, the humans will not be the only ones evolving over time; the disease will change too, and the outcome in this evolutionary arms race between the disease and the human immune system will swing first one way and then the other, creating ever-repeating cycles of civilisation and destruction depending on which has the upper hand at any particular point in time. How human societies would cope knowing that at any moment the disease that lies dormant within all of them could re-emerge and destroy everything they have strived to achieve is unclear, but it’s likely this would have highly destabilising effect and it’s unlikely humanity would ever reach it’s current pinnacle of technical development again. This means they’d never reach the point where they could potentially develop a definitive cure.

So what does all this mean? Well, once the humans have gone, the zombies will most likely follow after leaving the Earth to recover and carry on as if we’d never even existed. However, there’s a slight possibility that in the case of zombie-like infected, some will survive, forming a new type of human being that might one day shake off the shackles of the zombie disease, at least temporarily, and re-establish something we might recognise as human civilisation. It’s an interesting thought, isn’t it?



*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Advertisements

Book Giveaway: Win A Signed Copy Of ‘For Those In Peril On The Sea’

27 Apr

***UPDATE 11th May 2013: This competition has now closed. You can find details of the winners here***

To mark the 5,000th visitor to this blog since I started it at the end of 2012 as well as my 100th post (two landmarks that passed this week), I’m giving away five signed copies of the first edition of my post-apocalyptic thriller For Those In Peril On The Sea in a contest I’m running over the next two weeks. There’s no restrictions on where you live (although since the prizes will be mailed from the UK it may take some time to reach you) and if you wish you can choose to have your prize as a Kindle ebook rather than the first edition – but obviously ebooks will not be signed.

Apologies to any younger readers of this blog but have to be 16 or over to enter. Only one entry per person is allowed. While you’re required to enter your email address, this is only so I can get in touch with you if you win. You will receive no other emails and I’ll not store you email address anywhere once the competition is over.

To enter, simply visit the Amazon listing page of For Those In Peril On The Sea and answer the question below (only entries submitted using the form provided will be accepted).

Five names will be randomly selected from all the correct answers that reach me by the 15:00 BST on the 10th of May 2013 – that’s two weeks today (any entries received after that will be deleted). I’ll contact the winners by email to arrange delivery as soon as they are selected and will post the names of the winners here shortly after.

So here’s the question:



For Those In Peril On The Sea

For Those In Peril On The Sea available from http://www.amazon.com/For-Those-Peril-The-ebook/dp/B00BRLF8PS/




*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 9 – The Group Survival Dilemma

26 Apr

You’ve joined up with some other survivors. You only met them yesterday and you haven’t had time to know them properly yet. The group has set up a camp in a forest clearing and you’ve pitched your tent slightly away from the rest of them to give you a bit of privacy. You get up in early the next morning and find not only has the lookout fallen asleep but there’s a horde of zombies surging towards the camp. By some miracle, they don’t seem to have noticed you and are, instead, heading for the rest of the tents where everyone else is sleeping. If you sneak quietly away, you’ll survive but the others will be taken by surprise and they’ll be slaughtered by the swarm of undead that’s about to descend on them. If you shout a warning, you’ll alert the zombies to your presence making your successful escape much less likely but it will give the others a chance of getting away as well. What do you do?

 

As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.

*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

The Custom Of The Sea – A Short Diary From A Zombie Apocalypse

24 Apr

A PDF of this short story can be downloaded from here.

16th May: This is the 20th day since the dead came back to life. Well, not really life but a pale imitation of it which comes with an insatiable hunger for human flesh. I don’t know why I’ve decided to start keeping a diary now, but I have; I think it’s to do with Martin’s death. He died this morning; probably from starvation. We’re all pretty close but he was the first to go and now there’s only seven of us. I always hated this place, yet now it looks like I’ll spend what little is left of my miserable life here with the colleagues I despise so much. Martin was the only one I liked; now he’s gone I feel lonely and abandoned. I knew we should have run right at the beginning when we still had the chance but the others persuaded me it would be better to pull down the shutters, lock ourselves in and wait for the authorities to deal with the dead that were wandering the streets and attacking the living. Within a day it was clear there were too many of them for the army or anyone else to deal with but by then we were trapped, just the eight of us in the warehouse. We’d be okay if the company we worked for sold food but it didn’t; it sold stationary. We’ve tried going outside to search for supplies but the dead are everywhere and they always chase us back in before we got more than a few feet. We’ve seen from the upper windows what happens when the dead catch the living; it’s not pretty, and none of us want to go that way, but still we need to find something to eat or, like Martin, we’ll starve to death, and there’s nothing to eat in here.

17th May: I woke this morning to find the others discussing what to do with Martin’s body. We kept away from it at first, frightened he might come back but he didn’t, he just lay there: eyes sunken, cheeks hollow, his arms as thin as sticks. Steve was talking about starting a fire and initially I thought he was suggesting we cremate Martin. Then I realised Steve was talking about cooking and eating him. The very thought of doing that makes my stomach churn with disgust and I can’t believe he’d even suggested doing something so awful. Surely he can’t be serious.

18th May: For the first time since it happened I have a full belly but it makes me feel sick to think of what I’ve done. Steve was the one who did it; who cut Martin up into thin slices with a box cutter and cooked him on a fire he made from the reams of A4 paper that surrounded us. At first, I didn’t want to eat but the smell of the cooking meat was too tantalising; it smelled just like bacon and my body couldn’t resist. It wasn’t like we killed him and I’m sure Martin would have wanted us to do all we could to survive.

25th May: We ate the last of Martin four days ago and we’re starting to get hungry again. Steve keeps going on about something he calls ‘The Custom Of The Sea’. He says it’s an unspoken rule for people who find themselves trapped like us. He says it’s better for one of us to die so that the others can live long enough to be rescued than for all of us to die. I don’t know exactly what he’s talking about but I don’t like the sound of it.

26th May: Steve has finally made it clear what ‘The Custom Of The Sea’ is. He wants us to draw lots. Whoever picks the short straw would then kill themselves so that the rest of us could eat. Thankfully no one seems keen on the idea.

28th May: We drew lots today and it was Jimmy who lost. He looked dumbfounded at first then he started shouting that he wasn’t going to do it. Steve said that was okay, that it had to be voluntary but that we’d all agreed to the rules before we’d drawn lots and that he had a moral obligation to honour his word. Jimmy just refused.

29th May: I woke this morning to find Jimmy was dead. Steve told me he’d seen reason and had slit his throat in the bathroom but something seems wrong there. Jimmy was so against the idea last night and I can’t see what would have changed his mind. I was going to say something but before I could, the smell of cooking flesh started to swirl around me. It made my mouth water and all I could think about was how great it would taste in my mouth. When it was ready, I ate as greedily as the rest of them but afterwards, when I had time to think about what I’d just done, I almost threw up. Somehow I managed to keep it down though. Later I went upstairs and looked out of the window. The dead are everywhere: stumbling and shuffling around. I think they must know we’re in here because they’re crowding tightly around the shuttered doors now, trying to force their way in. I was hoping I could see a way out but I can’t; there’s just too many of them. I went into the office where I used to worked; the one administrator overseeing those on the warehouse floor. The phone lines are still down and with no power I can’t turn on the TV. I did find an old battery-powered radio but all I could find on it was static. It’s like we’re the only people left in the world. In a sudden and all-consuming fit of frustration and rage at what I’d been reduced to, I picked up my chair and smashed it repeatedly against the wall; it didn’t do anything to change our situation but as I surveyed the broken pieces of wood scattered across the floor, I felt better for it.

3rd June: Steve’s talking about drawing lots again but this time he says we have to draw twice; once to see who we’ll eat and once to see who’ll kill them. He says this is so that the person can’t back out like Jimmy did. This confuses me because I thought Jimmy killed himself; then I realise he didn’t and that Steve must have done it in the night. At first I can’t believe Steve would do that but then I think about it and realise it’s exactly the type of thing he’d do. I’ve always had him pegged as a bit of a psychopath, what with the way he’s always manipulating and bullying people to get his own way.

28th June: There’s just the two of us left now: me and Steve. Tomorrow we’ll draw lots to see who kills whom. I know he’s been fixing the draws, using them to control everyone else and to make sure he not only stays alive but isn’t the one who has to kill anyone. After all no one gets that lucky. I know I haven’t been; so far I’ve been forced to kill twice. What I don’t understand is why Steve has kept me alive so long. Maybe he doesn’t see me as a threat because it’s clear that since Jimmy, he’s been picking off those most likely to stand up to him. He hides it well, but I swear he’s enjoying what he’s been making us do.

5th July: I’ve just finished the last scrap of Steve, and now, if I want to eat again, my only choice is to go outside and face the dead. I didn’t wait until the morning to draw lots because I knew Steve was going to rig it; nor did I sleep the night before we were due to do it because I didn’t trust him. Instead, I sat up, keeping watch and making sure he didn’t catch me unawares. It was about four in the morning when I realised I couldn’t do this forever and that I needed to act before he did. That was when I picked up broken chair leg I’d brought down from my office earlier in the day and smashed Steve’s head in as he slept. Now I’ve eaten him, I’m all alone and I realise I’m no better than the dead that are crowding the doors outside. In fact, I may be worse; they do it because they don’t know any better while I knew exactly what I was doing. I keep telling myself I only did what I had to do to survive but still there’s a part of me that knows it would have been better to die.

8th July: I’m going outside now …

***

The title of this post refers back to a previous posting on this blog which considered whether humans, when trapped somewhere with no food and faced with the choice of going outside to face zombies or staying safe and starving to death, may well resort to cannibalism. You can read the original article here.



*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Life On The Ocean Waves…

22 Apr

Much of my writing is influenced by the sea. Lighthouses turn up regularly in my short stores (such as When Death Came To Flannan Isle and The Lighthouse At The End Of The Road) while sailing and life on the ocean waves are very much at the heart of both my debut novel (For Those In Peril On The Sea) and the sequel which I’m currently working (or at least that I should be working on but at the moment I keep getting distracted by other things – such as writing this blog and indeed the Maths With Zombies one I’ve just started). Here, I’d like to give you some idea of why the sea and sailing are so important to me, and it goes deeper than the simple fact that I’m a marine biologist.

Sailing is something I loved from the moment I first did it. Not sailing on a dingy but proper ‘big boat’ sailing. My first time was on a 72 foot ketch called Taikoo owned and run by the Ocean Youth Club (or Ocean Youth Trust as it’s now known), a charity which aims to introduce sailing to young people. I’d grown up pottering around on the ocean’s edge but at 16 it was the first time I’d taken to the sea on something other than on a ferry, which hardly counts. Soon I found myself in thirty foot seas at the heart of a near-hurricane force storm. It was hard, physical work and pretty much everyone was sea-sick to a greater or lesser extent as we cowered in the cockpit, clipped onto the safety lines and clinging to each other to stop ourselves being thrown all over the place. At one point we ended up almost ship-wrecked when the engine gave out at a critical moment. Through all of this I discovered something: I loved every bit of it.

The only trouble with falling in love with sailing was that it wasn’t something I really had many opportunities to do. This meant it was a while before I got to do it again. When I was doing my undergraduate degree, I went to do an internship in Newfoundland and within hours of stepping off the plane in St. John’s, I found myself, quite unexpectedly, on a yacht bound for Labrador in search of humpback whales. I spent a month dodging icebergs, fighting storms, photographing whales and drinking moonshine offered to us by the locals (after all it would have been rude to refuse their hospitality!). I also learned a huge amount about life at sea from the Captain, an ex-Maine fisherman turned professional yacht skipper (I’ll confess here that there’s more than a little of him in the character Bill in my book For Those In Peril On The Sea).

My next sailing experience was around Scotland on a beautiful gaff-rigged ketch, again looking for whales and dolphins (it was all part of my training as a marine biologist). I sailed on her a couple of times, enjoying the amazing scenery and the changeable weather. That was how I ended up visiting the remote and beguiling island of Mingulay. It’s now uninhabited and is somewhere you can only get to with your own boat but with it’s white sandy beaches and crystal clear waters, it’s one of the most beautiful places in the world. I’m going to be drawing on these memories a lot as I continue my work on the sequel to For Those In Peril On The Sea as it’s set amongst the islands of western Scotland.

From there I moved onto the Bahamas. I didn’t get to do a huge amount of sailing there, but I spent a lot of time on the water and got to know almost every inch of the beaches, bays and islands around the Sea of Abaco. Again, I was there because of work yet I also had plenty of free time to just head off and explore. It was there that I bought the first and only sailboat I’ve ever owned, an old North Star 1500 called Gone-with-the-Wind. I loved that boat more than almost anything else in the world and spent ages doing her up (she wasn’t in good shape after she’d got damaged in Hurricane Floyd). She also holds a special place in my heart because it was while I was living on her that I met Sarah, the love of my life. I sold her a few years later, the boat that is not Sarah, and it broke my heart but that was how I learned that owning your own yacht can be an extremely expensive business!

Since then while I’ve spent time more time at sea, it’s been on motorboats and ships rather than sailboats and I have to say I miss it. I long to get back to it, to feel the deck heeling under me again as the sheets strain and the sails fill. I think this was one of the reasons I enjoyed writing For Those In Peril On The Sea so much. It gave me the chance to re-live my memories of times I’d spent under sail and places I’ve visited. While the infected aren’t real and nor are any of the characters, much of the sailing and all of the places are based on my own experiences. The same is true for the sequel I’m currently working on, although it’s focussed closer to home than the Bahamas, it will again be fun to revisit the memories of my younger days.

As I have grown older, my career has taken me away from the sea and more behind a computer (both in terms of my academic life and my more recent ventures into writing fiction – well rather the sharing my fiction with the rest of the world). I will, however, take to the water under sail again, of that I’m certain. It’s simply a matter of time and circumstance and, if I’m ever to own my own boat again, a not insubstantial lottery win! Until then, I’ll have to just settle for writing, whenever I can, about life on the ocean waves.



*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

For Those In Peril On The Sea – Paperback Currently 1/3rd Off At Amazon.com

20 Apr

I’ve just noticed that the paperback version of my debut novel, For Those In Peril On the Sea, is currently available from Amazon.com for US$9.98. This is 1/3rd off the usual cover price of US$14.99. This discount is being offered by Amazon so I’m not too sure how long it will last but it’s a good opportunity to pick up a bargain. And the best thing is since Amazon are the ones offering the discount, I still get the same amount for every book sold!

For Those In Peril On The Sea.

For Those In Peril On The Sea.

Primarily set in the northern Bahamas, For Those In Peril On the Sea weaves its tale of post-apocalyptic survival into the local sub-tropical seascape and the sailing culture that can be found there. With its evocative use of real locations haunted by zombie-like infected and atmospheric depictions of the trials of life at sea drawn from the author’s own experiences, this debut novel from Colin M. Drysdale provides a new and unusual take on the traditional post-apocalyptic and zombie genres.

What The Official Reviewers Say:

‘… For Those in Peril on the Sea is not a mere imitator of currently popular zombie books and films. Drysdale’s novel proves different and superior in concept as well as content. The infected are unusual in ways that make them seem terrifyingly real, and the idea of the survivors being trapped offshore is an imaginative and effective twist. While some scenes in the book can be graphic and brutal, Drysdale never allows them to become gratuitous, and each disturbing moment serves a purpose in the plot. The tone of barely suppressed terror is emphasized by the author’s willingness to write as ruthlessly as his story demands: readers will quickly learn that even those who seem most deserving of survival can quite easily fall victim to the infected. …’ ‘Five Stars (out of five).’ – Foreword Clarion Reviews (click here to read the whole review).

What Readers Say:

‘As a long term fan of post apocalyptic fiction (The Stand, The Passage, World War Z etc.) I’m always keen to try out a new author. However, I must confess to a growing weariness with zombie fiction as it so often involves the same old stereotypes and locations – it’s been done to death – no pun intended. So I was pleasantly surprised that “For Those in Peril” served up some genuinely fresh ideas. So often tales of the zombie apocalypse centre around a group of survivors trapped in some urban location trying to escape to some safe haven, quite often the ocean, and when they finally get their hands on a boat they either suffer some cruel last minute attack or sail off into the sunset. But what happens next? Well that’s where this book comes in, exploring the consequences of life after the apocalypse. …’ Four Stars out of Five. Click here to read the whole review.

‘This is a quick read and fun for those into the zombie genre … I found I couldn’t put the book down and whizzed through it, while sitting on a sunny deck with a drink in my other hand. The author has obviously thought a lot about the practicalities of being stuck on a boat during a zombie infestation. …’ Five Stars out of Five. Click here to read the whole review.

Preview The Book:

Extracts from the first three chapters can be downloaded as a PDF from the book’s website (www.forthoseinperil.net) by clicking here.

From the back of the book:

After a six week voyage across the Atlantic, they couldn’t wait to get to shore. When they got there, they found the land would never be safe again…

There was nothing to suggest it would be anything other than a routine delivery. Four people thrown together by chance, sailing a newly-built catamaran from South Africa to Miami. But while they were away, something happened, something none of them could ever have imagined. When they get back to civilisation, they find it no longer exists. The land is no longer safe. Their only option is to stay on the boat and try to survive.

Join Bill, Rob, Jon and CJ as they travel around their frightening new world. One where they must struggle against the infected that now rule the land, the elements and each other.

 About The Author:

As a marine biologist, Colin M. Drysdale has spent plenty of time at sea with no land in sight but he is always glad when he finally gets back to shore. This novel is inspired by a thought that often plagues him during his voyages. What would he do if something happened while he was away and he could never go back?



*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 8 – The Crying Baby Dilemma

19 Apr

You’re in a group of eight people including your husband and your two older children, a boy aged twelve and a girl aged ten. There’s zombies nearby and you’re trying to keep as quite as possible so they don’t know you’re there as you creep away. Then your youngest child, a nine-month-old baby, starts to whimper. It’s quiet now but you know it’s a prelude to crying that’s only going to get louder and louder until it attracts the attention of the zombies. You have two other children to think about and the rest of the group but no matter what you do the child won’t stop crying. What do you do?*


As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.



*This dilemma originates in an episode of M*A*S*H, or at least that’s where I first remember coming across it (I could be wrong on this front so don’t quote me on that!).



*****************************************************************************
From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.