Archive | May, 2013

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 14 – The Scientist’s Dilemma

31 May

You and your team have been working away in the lab for months and you think you’ve finally had a break through. None of the monkeys you injected with the vaccine you made from the zombie extracts died this time round; and more importantly none of them came back. They also survived being exposed to the disease itself. Finally, it seems like you might have a weapon to fight the undead plague that’s over-running the world, but you can’t rest yet. The next step is to try it out on a human yet no one’s keen on volunteering to go first. Instead, they point out that if you’re so sure it’ll work, you’d be willing to try it on yourself. What do you do?


As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.

This dilemma was inspired by a real life medical scientist called Dr. Barry Marshall who proved that H. pylori caused stomach ulcers by purposefully drinking the contents of a petri dish containing the bacteria. He went on to win a Nobel prize for discovering the role that bacteria play in causing ulcers and other stomach problems. However, developing stomach ulcers to prove you’re right is one thing. Would he have been so keen if it had been an experimental zombie vaccine? Who knows!


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Sorry, Do I Know You?

29 May

I woke up this morning next to a woman I didn’t recognise. Don’t worry, it’s not as bad as it sounds, I knew exactly who she was, I just didn’t recognise her. Also, this happens to me pretty much every day. The woman in question is my girlfriend and we’ve lived together for more than a decade yet still I can’t recognise her. Actually, that’s not quite true, I recognise her voice, her hair, her body, the way she walks, I just don’t recognise her face. And it’s not only her, it’s pretty much everyone I’ve ever met. I even struggle to recognise my own face if I unexpectedly catch a glimpse of it in a mirror. I know this sounds odd, and it is, but it’s just the way I am.

The official name for this is prosopagnosia. There’s a common name too: face blindness. Until last week, few had ever heard of this condition; then in an interview with Esquire magazine Brad Pitt mentioned he has trouble recognising people and wants to get himself tested for face blindess. Suddenly, it seems like the whole world’s talking about it. This increased awareness can, I suspect, only be a good thing.

While I’ve almost certainly had face blindness all my life, it’s something I didn’t realise until quite recently. In fact, I didn’t even know it existed as a specific condition. I’ve always known I wasn’t good at recognising people by their faces, it’s just I didn’t realise this as unusual. I’d always been mildly surprised when people recognised me when I’d only met them once or twice or even when people could recognise actors in films, but it never crossed my mind that they were doing something different than I was.

About 1% of people have what I have and many, like me, won’t even have realised they have it until they stumble across a reference to it and go ‘A-ha, that’s me!’. However, looking back I can see it’s shaped a large amount of who I am. I take a lot of photos (I’ve even had my fair share published commercially) but rarely do I include people in them. This makes sense because if I did, I’d just find a bunch of people I didn’t recognise staring back at me whenever I looked at them. Where possible, I avoid social situations where I’m likely to meet people I’ve met before but who I don’t know well enough to recognise by non-facial cues and when I have no choice but to go to such events, I worry about offending people by not recognising them. I think it even influences the clothes I wear: I dress very distinctively (a lot of people know me as ‘the man in black’ – it’s not original but it’s apt) as if I feel this is a way I can make sure I’m recognisable to others.

So what’s it like living with a condition that means you don’t recognise other people’s faces? Well there’s two parts to it. The first is that I don’t recognise people when I should. If I see people I know out of context or if I’ve only met them once or twice or if they’ve change their hairstyle or grown facial hair, I’ll fail realise who they are (for this reason, I really hate Movember!). People always seem hurt when they see the blank look on my face and have to explain to me who they are. Then they see a smile of recognition spread across my face and all is forgiven. I think a lot of people assume that I’ve just forgotten them, but in reality I struggle to recognise pretty much everyone, including myself. When I first grew a beard, it took me about two years to recognise myself in a mirror. I was fine if I knew I was looking in one, but if I caught sight of myself unexpectedly I’d find myself thinking ‘Who the **** is that?’ before realising it must be me.

The flip side of the coin is that I’ll think I recognise people who I don’t know. Since I found out I have this condition, I’ve worked out why this is. It’s usually because they have a similar hairstyle (they’re not as unique as you might think they are and I’ve grown to realise that almost everyone has several ‘hair doubles’ wandering around in their local area). This means I frequently smile, or worse, at complete strangers only to find myself mistaken and cringingly embarrassed by what I’ve just done.

So where does this leave me as a writer? Well, firstly, I think it explains a lot about why I primarily write in the post-apocalyptic genres. I find myself in a world of faceless zombies every time I step out my front door. By this I don’t mean that they act like zombies but rather that all I see is a mass of people who all look the same to me, and lack the basic facial features that make them human (well, to be fair, they don’t lack them, I just don’t really see them). I also need prompts from other people to include descriptions of facial features in my writing but this is exactly why I get other people to read over my work and why I work with a professional editor when I’m working on books.

I know my own limitations and for the most part I can deal with them. Once I explain things to people, most accept what I say, although there’s still one or two who know me that think I’m making it up or that I just not don’t hard enough. My biggest problems have come when I’ve had brushes with the criminal justice system – not as a suspect, I hasten to add, but as a witness. The entire system is set up around the ability to recognise people by their faces. This is how victims identify their attackers, how police issue announcements of who they’re looking for and how things work when they get to court (just think of the question ‘Do you see that person in the court today?’). How can you work within such a system when you struggle to even recognise yourself? This is a theme that I’ve specifically explored in my writing and you can find a short story based around this here.

So, the bottom line is that I’m really bad at recognising people from their faces. This means that if I know you and I fail to say hello to you when we run into each other on the street, don’t be offended: I’m not giving you the cold-shoulder, I’ve just not recognised you. Similarly, if I don’t know you and I say hello to you in an overly-friendly manner, don’t worry I’m not some weirdo – it’s just that you happen to have the same hairstyle as someone I know!

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To test your facial recognition abilities, click here. To find out more about research into face blindness, click here.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Is Entomophagy The Secret To Surviving In A Post-apocalyptic World?

27 May

We all need food to survive, and whatever cause (be it the dead rising, environmental crisis or nuclear Armageddon), getting enough to eat will be a major hurdle to keeping yourself alive if civilisation collapses. Yet this is an issue which is glossed over in most post-apocalyptic books and films. In them, getting food is portrayed as a simple matter of raiding a warehouse for canned goods or shooting the occasional deer (or in the case of The Road having a basement full of captives!).

This, however, is woefully unrealistic. Few of us have the skills to successfully track a deer and unless you are already well-practiced in the art, shooting one isn’t as easy as it might appear to the uninitiated (you really have to get it through the heart or the lungs with the first shot or it’ll be off – as will every other animal in a two-mile radius!). What does that matter, you’re thinking, there’s still the supermarkets and store rooms, except that’s what everyone will think and warehouses will become battle grounds that are best avoided if you don’t want to end up dead. So what else can you do?

Lunch anyone? Mealworm beetle larvae can make a nutritious addition to any diet

Lunch anyone? Mealworm beetle larvae can make a nutritious addition to any diet

The thing is, there’s plenty of food out there; it’s just that it’s stuff you’re not used to eating. Yet, in a post-apocalyptic world, you can’t afford to be picky and you’ll have to adapt your expectations of what is and isn’t food. This is where entomophagy comes in. ‘What the **** is entomophagy?’ I hear you cry. Well, it’s the eating of insects as food. Insects are high in protein, full of the vitamins and minerals we need to stay healthy and, since 70% of all animals on the planet as insects, you can find them pretty much everywhere. I know what you’re thinking: insects, urgh – I’m not eating them! I can understand this disgust, but if you think about it, insects aren’t that different from the shrimps and lobsters you happily munch on without a second thought.

There’s something else which might help change your mind (or put you off eating altogether!). Even though you might not realise it, the chances are insects already make up a portion of your diet; a small portion, but a portion none-the-less. Did you know, for example, that the regulations from the US Food and Drug Administration mean that wheat flour can contain up to 150 insect fragments per 100g and still be considered safe to eat? Similarly, canned citrus fruit juice can contain up to 5 fly eggs per 250 ml or 1 maggot per 250 ml before being considered contaminated. This means you’re probably already eating insects (or more likely parts of them) on a daily basis without even realising it!

So, how can you shift insects from a small, and unintentional, part of your diet to a major component? Well, first you need a way to catch them. Luckily, you can do this very simple equipment. One of the easiest ways is called beating. This is where you put a large sheet under a tree or bush and then shake it or beat it with sticks. Get the right tree and within minutes, you’ll have enough insects to make a tasty meal for the whole family. If there’s no bushes or trees nearby, you can take the same sheet, form it into a kind of net and drag it through areas of tall grass, scooping up all the insects as you go. This is a particularly effective way of catching crickets and grasshoppers which, with their large fleshy abdomens are especially ‘meaty’.

If you don’t want to go to all that effort, you can also use pitfall traps to collect beetles that scurry over the ground as you simply sit back and wait. At night, you can set up a light trap (simply a light shone onto a sheet) which will attract all sorts of insects that will mistake it for the moon. Of course this assumes it’s safe to have a light burning at night – after all you only want to attract insects and not things like zombies, nuclear-powered mutants or whatever else might be wandering around your own particular post-apocalyptic world! If you can’t get outside, there’s no need to worry: the chances are there will be a smorgasbord of cockroaches scurrying around in the darker recesses of whatever building you’re holed up in. Just put some food scraps out, turn off the light and then scoop them up as soon as they appear.

If you’re dedicated and organised enough, you can even consider farming insects. In most cases, this will involve eating the larvae rather than the adults. For example, you can eat the nice plump maggots of various fly species, or grow your own beetle larvae. In particular, mealworms (the larvae of mealworm beetles – pictured above) are easy to keep as a self-sustaining culture as well as being very versatile when it comes to consuming them.

This brings us to the next issue. What do you do with the insects once you’ve caught them? At the most basic level you can simply toss them into a pan over an open fire and cook them until they’re crispy. However, if you so wish, you can get a lot more adventurous. How about sautéed crickets, or mealworm french fries? These are two of the recipes foun on the Insects Are Food website. You can even grind up mealworms and use them as a flour to make bread.

You might be surprised (or then again, given the wonders of the internet, you might not), but there’s plenty of sites that actively promote entomophagy as an environmentally-sustainable alternative to eating meat and fish, and they are full of advice about farming and cooking them. There’s even recipe books out there. The one I’d recommend (and indeed that I have a copy of myself) has the charming title of Eat-a-bug Cookbook: 33 ways to cook grasshoppers, ants, water bugs, spiders, centipedes, and their kin. This means there’s plenty of information out there where you can learn all you’d need to know to live off insects once the world as we know it comes to an end.

So what does all this mean? Well, if you preparing yourself to survive whatever type of apocalyptic event that you think might be coming to wreak havoc on the world around you, don’t just think about stocking up on the canned foods and the freeze-dried ready meals. As part of your preparations, learn how to catch insects and how to farm them too. You can also start practicing your entomological culinary skills. Next time there’s a sunny day, break out the barbecue, invite your friends and family round, but rather than the traditional burgers and hot dogs, treat them to something with a few more legs!


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 13 – The Soldier’s Dilemma

24 May

There’s been a fresh outbreak and your unit’s the first to be sent in. You’ve heard rumours about what the disease does to people but you’ve never seen a zombie up close before so you’re not too sure what they look like. You turn a corner and find yourself a few feet from a little old lady who’s shuffling slowly away from you. Something about her reminds you of your granny yet there’s something odd about her too. You shoulder your gun and line up the shot then a thought goes through your head: is she really infected or is she just old and infirm? If you call out to her, you’ll know the moment she turns round but if she’s infected she’s close enough that she might be on you before you can pull the trigger. What do you do?


As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.



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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

‘For Those In Peril On The Sea’ Kindle Edition – On Sale For $0.99 Until The End Of May 2013

23 May

The Kindle edition of For Those In Peril On The Sea is on sale at Amazon for $0.99 from now until the end of May 2013. After that, it’ll be back up to its usual price of $4.99.

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For Those In Peril On The Sea.

For Those In Peril On The Sea.

Primarily set in the northern Bahamas, For Those In Peril On the Sea weaves its tale of post-apocalyptic survival into the local sub-tropical seascape and the sailing culture that can be found there. With its evocative use of real locations haunted by zombie-like infected and atmospheric depictions of the trials of life at sea drawn from the author’s own experiences, this debut novel from Colin M. Drysdale provides a new and unusual take on the traditional post-apocalyptic and zombie genres.

What The Official Reviewers Say:

‘… For Those in Peril on the Sea is not a mere imitator of currently popular zombie books and films. Drysdale’s novel proves different and superior in concept as well as content. The infected are unusual in ways that make them seem terrifyingly real, and the idea of the survivors being trapped offshore is an imaginative and effective twist. While some scenes in the book can be graphic and brutal, Drysdale never allows them to become gratuitous, and each disturbing moment serves a purpose in the plot. The tone of barely suppressed terror is emphasized by the author’s willingness to write as ruthlessly as his story demands: readers will quickly learn that even those who seem most deserving of survival can quite easily fall victim to the infected. …’ ‘Five Stars (out of five).’ – Foreword Clarion Reviews (click here to read the whole review).

What Readers Say:

‘As a long term fan of post apocalyptic fiction (The Stand, The Passage, World War Z etc.) I’m always keen to try out a new author. However, I must confess to a growing weariness with zombie fiction as it so often involves the same old stereotypes and locations – it’s been done to death – no pun intended. So I was pleasantly surprised that “For Those in Peril” served up some genuinely fresh ideas. So often tales of the zombie apocalypse centre around a group of survivors trapped in some urban location trying to escape to some safe haven, quite often the ocean, and when they finally get their hands on a boat they either suffer some cruel last minute attack or sail off into the sunset. But what happens next? Well that’s where this book comes in, exploring the consequences of life after the apocalypse. …’ Four Stars out of Five. Click here to read the whole review.

‘This is a quick read and fun for those into the zombie genre … I found I couldn’t put the book down and whizzed through it, while sitting on a sunny deck with a drink in my other hand. The author has obviously thought a lot about the practicalities of being stuck on a boat during a zombie infestation. …’ Five Stars out of Five. Click here to read the whole review.

Preview The Book:

Extracts from the first three chapters can be downloaded as a PDF from the book’s website (www.forthoseinperil.net) by clicking here.

From the back of the book:

After a six week voyage across the Atlantic, they couldn’t wait to get to shore. When they got there, they found the land would never be safe again…

There was nothing to suggest it would be anything other than a routine delivery. Four people thrown together by chance, sailing a newly-built catamaran from South Africa to Miami. But while they were away, something happened, something none of them could ever have imagined. When they get back to civilisation, they find it no longer exists. The land is no longer safe. Their only option is to stay on the boat and try to survive.

Join Bill, Rob, Jon and CJ as they travel around their frightening new world. One where they must struggle against the infected that now rule the land, the elements and each other.

 About The Author:

As a marine biologist, Colin M. Drysdale has spent plenty of time at sea with no land in sight but he is always glad when he finally gets back to shore. This novel is inspired by a thought that often plagues him during his voyages. What would he do if something happened while he was away and he could never go back?


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Waiting For Reviews …

23 May

Writing, almost by definition, is a public art-form. There’s not really much point in writing if you’re not got to share your work with others. However, it’s one thing to share it with your friends and family, or even post it on your blog or on a forum, it’s quite another to put your head above the parapet and send it out to a reviewer. A good review from a recognised source can make your career as a writer, a bad one can consign your book to the remainder pile quicker than your publisher can ask for their advance back. Okay, I’m over-stating that for comic effect but good reviews will do more to make your book a success than almost anything else. The odd bad one here and there won’t really do you too much harm, but if you get too many, it will probably hurt your sales, and possibly your reputation (although it doesn’t seem to have done Dan Brown’s latest too much harm).

Regardless, I dread the period between sending a book off to a reviewer and the time the review finally comes out. I’ll spend it worrying, off and on, that the reviewer won’t get what I’m trying to say, that it might not be quite their cup of tea, that they might not like the characters or that they’ll think the premise is too outlandish. Then comes the day when the review is finally out. I know some writers say that they never read reviews (do such people really exist?), but I’m not that type of person. I’d rather know someone disliked it, and why, than not know at all. However, it’s always with great trepidation that I’ll check the website or open the email I’ve been sent that contains a copy of a long-awaited review (and it can be several months if the reviewer’s busy, as most reviewers are). Sometimes I’ll hum and haw over looking at it, putting it off but knowing that it’s there, waiting for me to pluck up the courage. Eventually, I’ll force myself to read it, or at least skim through it to get the gist of what the reviewer has to say. If they’ve hated it, I’ll leave it there; if they’ve loved it, I’ll go back and read it properly.

This was the position I found myself in this morning. I got an email saying new review of For Those In Peril On The Sea had just gone up on Literary Wealth, a blog which reviews books from independent and small publishers with the aim of finding and publicising those hidden gems that might not get the attention of those who review books from the big publishing houses. It took me a few minutes to pluck up the courage to visit the site, but when I did I was delighted to find that the reviewer had given it five stars out of five, and seemed to have really loved it.

If you want to check out the review in full, you can find it here. Me, I’m off to worry some more, because also in my inbox today was a note from another reviewer saying that they’d just received the copy I sent them and that they’ll get back to me in due course. All I can do it hope they’re a fast reader – and that they like it as much as the last one. Fingers crossed!


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

Winter’s End – A Short Zombie Story

22 May

A PDF of this story can be downloaded from here.

I saw the first sign of the approaching spring today. I was down in the lower field near the river looking for animal tracks in last night’s snow. It was only a light dusting but I was confident I’d find some and have a successful hunt for the first time in a week; instead I found fresh shoots breaking through the crust of snow which had blanketed the land around us since October. I was never much good with plants but I think they were snowdrops. We didn’t used to get them here but since my parents stopped farming the fields around here, all sorts of things had moved in.

That was well before the world fell apart, when the first spring plants appeared at the end of January; now the winters are longer and it’s usually March before any dare show themselves. The winter’s are harsher too and we struggle to survive, huddled together in a building with ill-fitting boards for windows and nothing but an open fire to keep us warm. In the past, we’d have snow but it would only stay for a week at a time, maybe two, before melting away. Now it lies heavily for six months or more on ground that’s as hard as iron. There’s no hope of ploughing it, of planting winter crops. All we can do is try to survive off the land and the meagre stores we can build up after the first frosts of autumn start to chill the air.

Mostly we eat meat: rabbits from the warren in the paddock or roe deer from the wood if I get really lucky. More often, though, it’s rats and mice from the barn that once housed chickens. The kids hated eating them at first but now they’re both skilled hunters. They come back with their catch tied by their tails to the stout wooden sticks they use to kill them; showing off and boasting about who’s caught the most. Before all this, they’d been disgusted by the sight of whole fish on the fishmonger’s slab at the supermarket but now they’re experts at gutting and skinning their tiny prey before throwing the carcasses into the stew pot.

If there’s been a good crop the year before, we’ll still have the acorns and beach nuts Mhairi grinds into flour with an old mill stone she’d unearthed behind the abandoned cow shed the first winter we were here. She then turns it into something that loosely resembles bread and which we can dip into our stew. When the crop’s poor, we run out of flour by the winter solstice and have to resort to eating lichen; it tastes awful but it gives us the vitamins we need to stay healthy and it stops our stomachs from rumbling.

Before all this happened, I’d been a touch on the heavy side. Not exactly fat but definitely carrying a few extra pounds. Now I’m all sinew and bone, my muscles wiry but hardened by the constant exertion needed to stay alive. Once I went into a neighbouring house looking for any supplies that might have been overlooked by those who’d already ransacked it and was startled to find an old man staring at me out of the gloom: hair limp and straggly, cheeks drawn and gaunt, eyes sunken and bloodshot. At first I thought he was one them, one of the rotters, and raised my axe but when the old man did the same I realised he was just my reflection in a grubby mirror that hung on the wall. I’m only forty-one but the last six years have taken their toll, and I now look closer to seventy.

Still, winter will soon be over and our life will change as it always does with the shift from one season to the next. We’ll pack the few belongings we still have and leave the remote farmhouse where I grew up. As the snow melts, we’ll move up into the mountains. Once there, we’ll set up our battered tents in a place we hope the ground will remain frozen but where we can still find some food. Up there, there’s no chance of rabbits or roe deer, and no rodents to supplement a poor hunt; instead we have to rely on catching the small song birds which hop from rock to rock. They’re difficult to trap and they have little meat on them, but their occasional presence in a diet that primarily consists of lichen and scrubby mountain herbs is a real treat in the lean months of summer.

This is the contrariness of the world we find ourselves trapped in. Winters, while harsh, at least allows us to venture far enough down from the mountains to find shelter in the old farm buildings on the valley floor. There’re woods where we can forage, and even a stream we can fish in if we can break through the ice. Then each spring, the thaw comes, melting the frozen ground, releasing the rotters trapped in its icy grip. Once free, they start their endless search for human flesh. Whenever I dare slip into the valley in summer in search something more nutritious than we can find in the mountains, I encounter enough to know it’s not safe to remain while the ground’s still soft. Once the first sign of spring was something to celebrate, but now it’s a warning that once again we’ll soon be banished from the lands where I grew up. Each spring we’re forced up into the highest reaches of the mountains where the ground remains permanently frozen and no rotters can reach us before they freeze solid. The chill of winter, the snow, the ice – they’re now our friends; the sun, and the heat it gives to the land, our enemy.

I won’t tell the others about what I found, not yet. Instead, I’ll give them a few more days to enjoy the luxury of being surrounded by four stone walls and all the rats they can catch. I’ll let the happiness of winter, when we can move freely without having to worry about the dead, last as long as I can but I know we’ll soon be exiled to the mountains once more.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.