Archive | June, 2013

What Readers Have Been Saying About ‘For Those In Peril On The Sea’

30 Jun

For Those In Peril On The Sea

For Those In Peril On The Sea available from http://www.amazon.com/For-Those-Peril-The-ebook/dp/B00BRLF8PS/

As of the 3rd of July 2013, For Those In Peril On The Sea will have been out for six months. With the Kindle edition being available for just $0.99 from now until the 7th of July 2013, I thought I’d take the opportunity here to summarise how it’s been received so far.

Overall, those who have read For Those In Peril On The Sea have enjoyed it, and found it to be an interesting take on the traditional zombie apocalypse novel which brings something new and unique to the genre. Many have also noted that it is appealing to readers who are not necessarily into zombies, finding that it reaches out beyond the zombie genre, and even beyond the wider post-apocalyptic one. This is highlighted by the fact For Those In Peril On The Sea was selected as one of only five finalists in the ForeWord Firsts Winter 2013 competition for debut novels!

There’s only really been one critical point which has been raised in some of the reviews, and this is that there were a couple of typos which had been missed in the final copy editing process. These have now been sorted in the Kindle ebook edition and, thanks to the wonders of modern publishing, in the international print edition (available from Amazon.com).

So, what have readers actually said about For Those In Peril On The Sea? Well, here’s some excerpts and links to the reviews themselves:

ForeWord Clarion Review: ‘…For Those in Peril on the Sea is not a mere imitator of currently popular zombie books and films. Drysdale’s novel proves different and superior in concept as well as content. The infected are unusual in ways that make them seem terrifyingly real, and the idea of the survivors being trapped offshore is an imaginative and effective twist. While some scenes in the book can be graphic and brutal, Drysdale never allows them to become gratuitous, and each disturbing moment serves a purpose in the plot. The tone of barely suppressed terror is emphasized by the author’s willingness to write as ruthlessly as his story demands: readers will quickly learn that even those who seem most deserving of survival can quite easily fall victim to the infected. …’ Five Stars out of Five. Click here to read the full review.

Literary Wealth Review: ‘… For Those in Peril [On The] Sea by Colin M. Drysdale was a gripping tale of loss, triumph, heartache victories, but mostly the will to survive in a new world with so many challenges. The book was intriguing, and sometimes terrifying enough that I had put it down so that I could absorb what I had read. Mr. Drysdale’s writing is smooth and wonderfully descriptive. He has an impressive knowledge of boats, sailing, and of faraway lands. For Those in Peril [On The] Sea is a terrific read …’ Five Stars out of Five. Click here to read the full review.

Zombiegift.com: ‘… For Those In Peril On The Sea takes a fresh and unique approach to the typical zombie story. The characters aren’t just using the sea to get from one location to another. They’re living on the water to take advantage of the fact that the infected won’t tread into deep water to pursue them. They rely on the sea and become part of a floating community that depends on the resources the sea provides while simultaneously struggling to overcome the obstacles it throws their way. … There is just the right amount of gore and blood without it being gratuitous. One of my favorite aspects when reading this book was being drawn in by the mistakes characters make when escaping from the infected. Like a good horror movie this novel has a few “why on earth would you do that!?” moments that leave the characters trapped and facing certain death. …’ 4.25 Stars out of Five. Click here to read the full review.

Buyzombie.com: .’.. [The] narrative voice is very strong. This is quite reminiscent of the books of David Moody in places; the poignancy and the business of day to day survival, mingled with the fact that like the Hater books, these ‘zombies‘ aren’t actually dead. … All in all this is a very welcome addition to the genre and is solidly written. Drysdale’s experience as a marine biologist certainly adds a new dimension to the zombie novel. A good read.’ Click here to read the full review.

The Student: ‘… The author is a self-professed lover of the zombie-apocalypse genre … However, the narrative of the story is alluring to readers of other genres as it shows depth on an anthropological and philosophical scale. It successfully extricates the reader from the comfortable plateau of reality, and introduces the chilling notion of complete division from society and self-navigation. …’ Three Stars out of Five. Click here to read the full review.

Goodreads.com – Overall rating 4.67 stars out of five based on six ratings:

‘… Although post-apocalyptic literature is not something I usually read, I enjoyed this story about a virulent strain of rabies that infects most of the global population, leaving the survivors isolated from the rest of the world…. The author does a wonderful job at creating a frightening world where the fears and uncertainties plaguing the characters reveal the deepest terrors of humanity when pitted against horrific odds, and the lengths one must go to survive. I was especially interested in the author’s description of sailing and the sea that he draws from his own personal experience. Fans of dystopian and post-apocalyptic literature are in for a treat.’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘Well, this is the first post apocalyptic zombie book I’ve read, so nothing to compare it to. But, I’ll have to say, the book hits the spot. …’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘…The author does a wonderful job at creating a frightening world that reveals the deepest terrors of humanity when pitted against horrific odds, and the lengths one must go to survive. I was especially interested in the author’s description of sailing and the sea that he draws from his own personal experience. Fans of dystopian and post-apocalyptic literature are in for a treat.’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘… For Those in Peril on the Sea by Colin M. Drysdale was a gripping tale of loss, triumph, heartache, victories, but mostly the will to survive in a new world with so many challenges. The book was intriguing, and sometimes terrifying enough that I had put it down so that I could absorb what I had read. Mr. Drysdale’s writing is smooth and wonderfully descriptive. He has an impressive knowledge of boats, sailing, and of faraway lands. …’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘rrrrrrrrr………..sdssds………. Is that the kind of noises zombies make? ..Hopefully I never get to find out. Anyways! This book scared the crap out of me – in a good way. …’ Four Stars out of Five.

Click here to read the Goodreads.com reviews in full.

Amazon.com – Overall rating 4.5 stars out of five based on six reviews:

‘This is a quick read and fun for those into the zombie genre … I found I couldn’t put the book down and whizzed through it, while sitting on a sunny deck with a drink in my other hand. The author has obviously thought a lot about the practicalities of being stuck on a boat during a zombie infestation. …’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘… For Those in Peril on the Sea by Colin M. Drysdale was a gripping tale of loss, triumph, heartache, victories, but mostly the will to survive in a new world with so many challenges. The book was intriguing, and sometimes terrifying enough that I had put it down so that I could absorb what I had read. Mr. Drysdale’s writing is smooth and wonderfully descriptive. He has an impressive knowledge of boats, sailing, and of faraway lands. …’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘I was attracted to this book by the zombie theme and the fact that I had recently visited Hope Town, one of the major locations in the book. … I found the book well written with a good plot and good character development. Mr. Drysdale is a very good writer and For Those In Peril On The Sea was a good little read.’ Four Stars out of Five.

For Those in Peril On The Sea is a welcome and refreshing unique new take on the zombie genre. Drysdale’s novel does a brilliant job of taking the same old zombie story, keeping the right elements and putting just the right spin on the core survival story elements. This book has a near perfect balance of gore, horror, personal struggle, character development and suspense. …’ Five Stars out of Five.

‘A very fun and well-written book with some unique and new perspectives on surviving a zombie apocalypse. Among the best of the genre.’ Four Stars out of Five.

‘Zombies and boats, two great things that actually go great together. I like the occasional zombie book but the real attraction for me was the boat as survival tool. He got the boats right, so that’s a big thing for me. Good twists on his version of zombies. Moments of true terror. …’ Four Stars out of Five.

Click here to read the Amazon.com reviews in full.

Amazon.co.uk – Overall rating 4 starts out of five based on one review:

‘As a long term fan of post apocalyptic fiction (The Stand, The Passage, World War Z etc.) I’m always keen to try out a new author. However, I must confess to a growing weariness with zombie fiction as it so often involves the same old stereotypes and locations – it’s been done to death – no pun intended. So I was pleasantly surprised that For Those in Peril [On The Sea] served up some genuinely fresh ideas. So often tales of the zombie apocalypse centre around a group of survivors trapped in some urban location trying to escape to some safe haven, quite often the ocean, and when they finally get their hands on a boat they either suffer some cruel last minute attack or sail off into the sunset. But what happens next? Well that’s where this book comes in, exploring the consequences of life after the apocalypse. …’ Four Stars out of Five. Click here to read the Amazon.co.uk reviews in full.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 18 – The Passenger Next To You Dilemma

28 Jun

You’re on a plane. It was the last flight out so you had no choice but to take it. If you hadn’t the zombies would have over-run the airport before you could get away. The man in the set next to you has a bandage round his hand and is sweating heavily. You look out the window, you’re now high above the sea and it will be another five hours before the plane can land in the safe zone. You look back at the man, he seems to be lapsing in and out of consciousness. He could just be ill but you have a horrible suspicion he’s infected the with the virus that turns people into zombies. If he is, he’ll turn into a before you’re back on the ground and there will be no getting away from him in the close confines of the cabin. What do you do?


As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.

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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

The Day Job – Or What I Do To Earn A Living When Writing Isn’t Enough

26 Jun

Like many authors, I don’t as yet make enough money from writing fiction to have been able to give up my day job completely. Even if I did, though, I don’t think I would. You see for the last twenty years I’ve worked as a marine biologist who specialises in studying whales and dolphins. Now I know what you’re thinking, that sounds idyllic and that I must spend most of my time swimming in the waters around some tropical isle somewhere watching the dolphin play. While there have been times in my life when this was true, life as a jobbing marine biologist is usually much more mundane. I do, however, find it quite fascinating. So what would my typical work day consist of?

Well for a start, I don’t work Monday to Friday, nine to five. Depending on exactly what I have to do, some days I’ll work nine till twelve, giving me time to work on my fiction writing, others, especially if it involves field work, might run from sunrise to sunset, and in Scotland in summer, that can be as much as 20 hours seven days a week for several weeks at a time! If I’m working at sea, much of the time will be spent on the bridge of a ship, binoculars in hand, staring out to sea, looking for whales and dolphins. It’ll generally be two hours on, one hour off and while at times it can be very exciting, mostly when there’s animals around, at others it can seem like the ocean is dead and there’s nothing but endless rolling seas out there. Every fifteen minutes, I’ll log the position of the ship, so we know where we’ve surveyed, as well as information about the weather. Whenever I see something, I’ll log the position again, along with information about what species it is and how many there are. If I get the chance, I’ll take a few photos or shoot some video. At the end of the day (and before going to bed), this information is all transcribed into a spreadsheet and a summary of the day is written.

If I’m not working at sea, like pretty much everyone else I’ll start my day by checking my email. A lot of it will be fairly boring, routine stuff like requests to review academic papers or people asking to data, but every now and then it’s something much more interesting. The ones I like best are the ones where people are asking me to identify something. Sometimes it’s living animals, sometimes it’s a dead one on a beach or a skull. These always present a bit of a challenge but it’s like trying to solve a mystery from a load of little clues. You see, I happen to be a bit of an expert on an obscure group of whales known as beaked whales. There’s 21 species in all (or at least as far as we know at the moment!) and we know very little about them. In fact, some of them have never been seen alive and a few are only known skeletons found cast up on beaches. This makes identifying them a bit tricky, hence the reason my expertise is requested, and I may spend a happy hour or two pulling out books and academic papers, looking through photographs and digging up old measurements trying to work out which one it is this time. Much of the time, I can get an identification, but at others there’s no way to know because a vital piece of information is missing from the photos. One notable occasion it was because I was pretty sure that it was either something no one had ever seen before or that it was in completely the wrong ocean (this happens from time to time!).

Once the emails are out of the way, it’s down to work. Depending on exactly what I’m working on, this can be anything from analysing data and running statistical tests (always a bit boring, at least until you get the result), writing an academic paper or a presentation for a conference, to giving lectures to students, creating maps showing where different species occur and writing articles for magazines, books and encyclopaedias. None of this is necessarily fun but it has to be done. This is because doing science isn’t just about collecting data and hording it. Instead, it’s about communication what you’ve found out to the rest of the world. At the moment, much of my research revolves around trying to work out how whales and dolphins are going to be affected by climate change, and what we can do to stop these things happening; unfortunately, so far the rather depressing answer to this is not much unless we address climate change itself but I, along with many others, none-the-less keep trying in case we can come up with something that will work.

It’s my research on the effects of climate change on whales and dolphin which has probably led to the biggest change in how I do my work over the years. You see scientists like doing two things: science and flying to interesting places to talk to other scientists about science. This means that going to academic conferences and meetings to present your work to others is a big part of being a scientist (it’s also a great excuse to get drunk with friends and colleagues from far off places who you don’t get to see very often). However, this means a lot of jetting all over the planet. A few years ago, I took the decision that I couldn’t really criticise other people for their impacts on whales and dolphins which I was studying when I was part of the problem. This means I now only attend these meeting if I can do it remotely through video feed over the internet rather than in person. It’s not as much fun (having a beer at lunchtime with a bunch of old friends is one thing, drinking it at home on your own is quite another!) but it keeps my carbon footprint down.

Anyway, that’s probably enough about what I do to earn a crust when I’m not writing about zombies. While these may seem like quite different worlds, there’s a surprising amount of overlap. For example, while academic papers and talks can be quite dry and boring, they actually have a very similar structure to works of fiction. Both need to tell a story, have interesting characters, and have a beginning a middle and an end. It’s just that in academic writing, the story is the hypothesis you’re testing, the characters are your study animals and the beginning, middle and end are called, introduction, methods and results, and discussion. Similarly, it takes the same type of discipline to sit down and write a scientific thesis as it does to write a novel. You also need to know how to edit your work so that it flows nicely, and get used to dealing with both rejections (from publishers for fiction writing and from journals for academic writing) as well as hatchet-job reviews from people who, for whatever reason, don’t want you to succeed. Actually, I’ve had a lot more of that in academia than I’ve had with fiction writing – academics tend to get very territorial if you show that the cherished theory they’ve based their entire career on is wrong!.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

A Zombie Haiku

26 Jun

It lurches towards me,
Flesh rotting and blood dripping.
My end is coming.

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While I usually post a short story in this Wednesday slot, I thought I’d do something a little different this week and post a zombie Haiku. A Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that consists of 17 on or morae laid out in a five, seven, five format (that is five on in the first line, seven in the second and five in the last). When written in English, an on is usually taken to be a syllable (although the two are not strictly synonymous). I wrote this as a bit of fun, just to see whether a zombie Haiku would work, and I was pleasantly pleased with the result. If this gets your creative juices flowing, feel free to post your own zombie haiku in the comments section below.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

How Do Zombies Know Where You Are?

24 Jun

I watched the World War Z movie on Friday, and there were a couple of scenes which got be thinking about how zombies know where people are. I won’t discuss the scenes themselves in case you haven’t seen it yet (and I’d definitely recommend doing so), but I think this is an interesting question and it’s one I’ll explore in this post. As humans, we are primarily visual animals and, for most of us, our eyesight is the main sense we use to find out about the world around us. To a lesser extent, we also use sound while our remaining senses, smell, taste and touch, are usually only used once we’re already aware of what’s going on.

With zombies, things might be different, but this will depend on the type of zombies we’re talking about. If we’re talking about living humans infected with some sort of disease, sight and sound will still be the primarily senses by which they will detected uninfected humans. The more traditional risen-from-the-dead type zombies, however, will be differ. While in some cases, it appears that these dead zombies can still use their sight, as a rule they seem to be less visual creatures. In particular, in many cases the eyes are specifically portrayed as being clouded over (as an indicator of death), meaning that such zombies are probably limited to seeing changes in light intensity rather than any actual images. This means the best they can probably do visually is detect movement and orient towards it. In contrast, sound seems to be a much more important sense for dead zombies, and in almost all zombie scenarios, it’s unintended noises which alert zombies to the presence of humans. There’s the possibility that such zombies might also rely more on other senses such as smell to tell if humans are nearby but given the limitations of the human nose, this will, at best, be an imperfect mode of detection.

However, when it comes to zombies knowing where you are, there’s more to this than just whether zombies can tell you are there or not. In particular, there’s the question of how zombies tell the difference between normal humans and their fellow undead, since almost every scenario presented in films and books suggests that zombies don’t attack each other. Well, I think there’s two options here. The first is through something like smell. If we’re talking about infected type zombies, many diseases cause humans to give off specific odours, and indeed this is the basis for diagnosis in some cases, while if we’re talking about dead zombies, they may also smell different because of decomposition. This means zombies could tell who’s normal and who isn’t by their scent. This possibility is the basis of the scene from The Walking Dead where the characters cover themselves in rotting flesh from dispatched zombies to allow them to walk through the undead which surround them. However, this would only work across small distances and it seems even over longer distances, zombies can tell the difference between their brethren and normal humans, pursuing the former while ignoring the latter. This suggests zombies can also tell the differences through movements. In almost all cases, zombies, whether fast or slow, and humans move in very different ways and these differences may allow zombies to identify their prey from a great distance. This possibility is the basis of the scene in Shaun of the Dead, where the eponymous hero and his friends cover the last few yards to the Winchester through a mass of zombies by mimicking their movements.

Yet, this still leaves some apparent problems. For a start, zombies seem to be able to know where humans are from greater distances than they could possibly see, hear or smell them, and they seem to be drawn towards areas of human habitation from great distances and across landscapes where lines of sight are limited. How else could you explain the hordes of zombies which tend to descend on and surround the safe houses where humans are hiding? Well, I think the answer here is what I’ll call the ‘vulture’ effect. Vultures hunt by soaring on thermals and scanning the ground below them searching for dead or dying animals. Yet, they don’t devote all their attention to what is going on below; they also watch the other vultures in the skies around them. When one detects food and starts to dive towards the ground, those around them know what this means and do the same, and so do the ones around them and so on. This means hundreds of vultures spread over great distances can descend on a potential food supply within minutes. Zombies, I suspect, would operate in a very similar way and when they hear or see other zombies reacting as if they’ve detected humans, they will be drawn towards the same point. This means that once one zombie detects your presence, you are likely to find yourself inundated within a very short space of time as all the zombies within the local area follow each other towards your location. Interestingly, this concept is depicted in the World War Z book, where they drop soldiers into a location, have them form a square and keep shooting until all the zombies which are drawn to the location from all over the place by other zombies are dead.

So what does all this mean for your survival if you’re unlucky enough to find yourself caught up in a zombie apocalypse? Well, firstly, if even one zombie detects that you are there, the vulture effect is likely to come into play, and many other zombies are likely to be drawn to you very quickly. This means you will only have a very short space of time to escape before you’re surrounded on all sides by hordes of flesh-munchers intent on tearing you limb from limb. If you can’t get away fast enough, there’s an outside possibility that you might be able to disguise yourself in some way so that the zombies can’t tell you are a normal human. You could try mimicking their movements or covering up your scent, but without knowing exactly how they are telling human from zombie this will always be a very risky strategy. In addition, this will probably only work for dead-type zombies and it’s unlikely that the infected type will be fooled so easily. In this way, infected-type zombies are probably more difficult to evade than the dead ones. Either way, however, your best chance of survival is to make sure the zombies don’t find out you’re there in the first place, so keep quiet and keep still!


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

World War Z – Does The Film Of The Book Work?

21 Jun

A while ago, I posted an article here about whether the movie of Max Brook’s World War Z would work or not. Now, the long-awaited day is finally here (exactly six months to the day from its original release date) and the film is finally out. This meant that rather than do the work I should have been doing this afternoon, I snuck out to see it at a little neighbourhood cinema near where I live. So, to return to the question in my previous posting, does the movie work?

Well, I have to say, and I’m aware this may be a controversial point of view amongst fans of the book, I really liked it. It’s fast-paced, it has a good strong plot, the zombies are good (well for the most part – a few sketchy CGI bits here and there but nothing which made me want to throw things at the screen) and, probably most surprisingly of all, it actually adds something completely original to the zombie genre that I hadn’t come across before. I can’t tell you what it is as it would ruin the movie – but the hastily-reworked last third of the film revolves around it and I thought it was a really interesting idea. Certainly, it made me stop and think, and I think it’s one that zombie fans will argue over for years to come. Once the movie’s been out a while, I’ll even need to write a post exploring the concept they’ve introduced as it’s quite interesting from a scientific perspective as well as a zombie one.

I have to say, I’d gone into the cinema with my fingers crossed, hoping that it would at least be a passable action movie, but right from the start it became clear this wasn’t the potential turkey a lot of people in the media had been making it out to be. This is a genuine zombie movie which manages to bring something new to the genre, while remaining appealing to a wider audience. While it’s not up there with the likes of 28 Days Later (but then very little within the zombie genre is!), it’s definitely much closer to that sort of level than I expected. If we take 28 Days Later as the gold standard and say it’s a 10, then World War Z is a good solid 8. In my books, this would put it in the same sort of league as 28 Weeks Later (nowhere nearly as good as its predecessor, but a good film in its own right).

I think the biggest problem for the movie version of World War Z, and this was always going to be a major stumbling block, is the title. With the book being so good, and so unfilmable, this title was always going to bring an awful lot of baggage with it and I don’t think the movie quite gets away from it. With a different title, I think zombie fans would be all over this film, saying how great it is to see a good mainstream zombie movie. However, going under the title of World War Z is always going to have those who loved the book complaining. This is because, as I’ve said before, this is quite clearly not a film of the book. Instead, it’s a film set in the same world as the book (although even some of the basic zombie lore has been tweaked so the two worlds don’t quite match up), and a different title would have made this clearer.

Anyway, having finally seen the movie, I think that as long as it can get out from under the formidable shadow of the book, it will be a hit. However, it’s still unclear whether it will manage it, and if it doesn’t that would be a shame because it’s a genuinely good movie in its own right and it’s one that I think will definitely have people talking.

Of course there was one other thing that disappointed me a little. This was that I didn’t managed to catch myself on screen! I saw a few of my fellow extras from the opening scene, and in particular I spotted my friend Mike the delivery driver (who, having time off his real job as a delivery driver to be an extra on the movie, arrived on set only to find he’d been cast as, you guessed it, a delivery driver!), but alas not myself. I might still be in there somewhere, but it will have to wait for the DVD to come out so I can have a closer look. So much for my career as a Hollywood movie star!


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.

What Would You Do If … Dilemmas In A Zombie Apocalypse: No. 17 – The Donner Party Dilemma

21 Jun

The three of you have been locked in the warehouse for months, surrounded by zombies that batter and tear at every door and shutter, scratching their fingers into bony stumps in their efforts to get in. You ate the last of the food six weeks ago and you know you’re dying from starvation. Then you hear the news you’ve been waiting for coming over the little wind-up radio you found: what’s left of the army are finally making headway against the undead hordes and if you can only survive long enough, within a few weeks you might finally be free. You look round at your companions and realise one of them has finally succumbed to the lack of food. You glance at your fellow survivor, then back to the dead body. That’s when something occurs to you: there’s enough meat left on him to allow you to last until the army get to your city and clear out the zombies. This means that if you eat him, you’ll survive long enough to be rescued. If you don’t you will die in a matter of days. What do you do?


As always, this dilemma is just here to make you think, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Vote in the poll to let others know what you do if you were in this situation, and if you want to give a more detailed answer, leave a comment on this posting.

This dilemma was inspired by two previous posts on this blog, both of which considered the scenario of cannibalism within groups of people trapped in buildings during a zombie apocalypse. The first considered the likelihood that this would happen, while the second was a short story based around this type of situation.


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From the author of For Those In Peril On The Sea, a tale of post-apocalyptic survival in a world where zombie-like infected rule the land and all the last few human survivors can do is stay on their boats and try to survive. Now available in print and as a Kindle ebook. Click here or visit www.forthoseinperil.net to find out more. To download a preview of the first three chapters, click here.

To read the Foreword Clarion Review of For Those In Peril On The Sea (where it scored five stars out of five) click here.